Is Imitation Flattery?

12 Jul
2012
Posted in: Reality
By    2 Comments

Growing up, you’re always told that imitation is the best form of flattery. If imitation is flattery, then what is downright plagarism?

If you create content online, it’s a good idea to play Nancy Drew every few months and see if that content has developed its own life, a life outside your website. I finally had a chance to catch up in Seattle, and I found a few abuses. There’s the site that’s shamelessly copying Paul and Joe’s content from Dappered (not going to link to the offending site here, it’s being handled…) and a few less odious examples of single Driving Inertia posts being copied without link backs…that are probably just scams.

Everyone borrows content or photos from time to time, but there’s a difference between legitimate and illegitimate uses of other people’s material. Using something without credit is like writing a paper in school and forgetting to cite a source. It’s good form to always include a credit, a link back, or some type of note indicating the original source of the material you’re sharing, borrowing, or using in any way.

Happily, I found plenty of legit links to our site too. Here are three of my favorites:

This guy was sincerely offended by my jokey take on camping setups we’ve encountered (unless I really don’t understand sarcasm or the fact that those are my images):

 

This site linked to one of Paul’s pics in a hilarious photo essay loosely related to Stanley Kubrick:

 

This interesting photog’s site (check out the Archive page for a cool view of past content — I want it) also linked to Paul’s Biosphere 2 post:

 

The bottom line is not to be paranoid, but to be informed. You can’t control everything, you just want to keep an eye out for the worst offenders. And the most amusing links.

  • 3500Leavitt

    http://expeditionmotorhome.com/no-thats-not-a-unimog/

    “Generally, I find sarcasm detestable.”

    I want to hang out with THAT guy.

    Oh wait, was that sarcastic?

    • It’s funny. Of course I was jealous! Here we were (in Death Valley), in a place with hundreds of miles of backcountry roads and campgrounds, in one of my favorite places in the country. We had to choose our vehicle based on things like gas mileage, resaleability, inconspicuousness. We had to live in it for a year, not for a vacation. It was so limiting. It was a trade-off. And here we were, looking at someone who was in a vehicle that was theoretically unlimited, that could drive over mountains. Imagine the cost of that vehicle, the cost of transporting it on vacation with you, from Germany to the US! Just to take it to a campground, where there was nothing special on offer: no water to fill the tank, no power to charge the batteries, no showers in which to bathe. God, I’m still jealous.